Month: October 2022

A new analysis of U.S.-based pediatrics research published over the last decade found that just 9% of studies included non-English-speaking children or families, highlighting a lack of representation that could have serious implications for health equity. The findings are published today in a JAMA Pediatrics analysis led by University of Pittsburgh researchers. It is frankly
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In a recent Pediatrics journal study, researchers assessed the outcomes of children born to mothers infected during pregnancy with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In utero, mother-to-child SARS-CoV-2 transmission is possible; however, the mechanisms remain unknown. Previous studies have reported the transplacental passage of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, thereby providing some passive protection to newborns.
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People with autoimmune or auto-inflammatory rheumatic diseases have an increased risk of infections. This can be due to the underlying disease itself, or may be caused by treatment with immunomodulating or immunosuppressive drugs. Vaccinations play an important role in infection prevention. But children with pedAIIRD require a vaccination schedule that takes into account their disease
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Last year’s Squid Game craze actually feels kind of tame compared to some of these trendy yet highly problematic kids costumes. Halloween! It’s a time for tricks, treats, and colourful, creative costumes. There are countless traditional costume options for your kids out there—clowns, ghosts, animals, vampires and so many more. But then there are those
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Pediatric musculoskeletal ultrasound (PedMSUS) has great potential in the evaluation of children with arthritis, and since 2012 several PedMSUS courses have been endorsed by EULAR – The European Alliance of Rheumatology Associations. But despite this, there has been no agreed educational procedure for the conduct, content and format of these courses. This is critical, since
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Huntington’s disease, a fatal, inherited neurodegenerative condition, is caused by a genetic error present at birth, though its symptoms often don’t begin until middle adulthood. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have been trying to understand how the aging process triggers the onset of symptoms, with the expectation that such knowledge
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By trick-or-treating as safely as possible and preparing for all potential mishaps, you’ll be set for a night of fun, not fright.  Your toddler’s first Halloween is super exciting, but it can also be scary—both for your first-timer, who isn’t used to being out in the dark with spooky decorations; and for their parents, who
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St. Louis Children’s Hospital is one of the ONLY hospitals in the nation that hosts an adaptive triathlon to champion kids on the move. The Tri My Best adaptive triathlon encourages children with movement disorders to swim, cycle and run their way to the finish line!
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Trained developmental-behavioral pediatricians can generally diagnose autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in young children without the need for additional Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) testing, finds a prospective multicenter study. The study, conducted through the Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics Research Network (DBPNet) and led by Boston Children’s Hospital, was published October 17 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.
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Fetal growth -; which is delicate and precisely programmed -; may be disrupted by a mother’s exposure to air pollution and psychological stress during early to mid-pregnancy, a new USC study shows. The findings, published today in JAMA Network Open, suggest that protecting pregnant women from air pollution may improve birth weight, especially among stressed-out
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Chickenpox, called varicella by scientists, is a formerly ubiquitous childhood illness that produces a characteristic vesicular rash of varying extent and severity. In earlier days, chickenpox affected almost every child. however, the incidence of this condition has dropped steeply following the introduction of varicella-zoster vaccines. Study: 25 Years of Varicella Vaccination in the United States.
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